Why we need experts

I’ve got to confess that I was planning this post last night.  At that time, I wasn’t aware of a recent Webmd article about sports training for female teens.  Fortunately, I saw a link for it on Twitter this AM.  The article is a great lead in to my post.  If you haven’t read it, I encourage you to do so.

I think that the article does a great job of touching on several points.  First and foremost, it addresses several things that females need to be doing to prepare and it explains why.  Anyone who works with athletes should be aware of the fact that female ACL injuries occur more often than they do to males.  They should also know how to train an athlete to try to prevent their occurance.  The article also emphasizes having a well designed plan to follow when training.  The article closes by discussing the imporantance of proper nutrition.  This is a subject that cannot be overemphasized when dealing with athletes at any level. 

By now you’re probably wondering what my original post was going to be about and how this article played into it. My original idea was to write about the training of athletes needing to be led by someone who is qualified to do it.  Too many times I’ve seen a sport coach decide to design a strength/speed/agility program for their athletes.  There are some sport coaches who can accomplish this and design a safe and effective program.  Unfortunately, there are a large percentage who cannot do this.  Just because someone coaches a sport does not mean that they have a full understanding of :

  • program design
  • safety
  • preventative (“prehab”) exercises
  • exercise technique
  • speed/agility mechanics
  • corrective exercises/drills

I have worked with some great coaches in my career (and a few not so great, but we won’t go into that….).  There is no doubt that some of those coaches understood their sport inside and out.  My favorite sport to watch is football.  I’ve watched it, played it, and worked around it.  While I might know some about it, I have worked with coaches who knew 100+ times more than I do.  They were the “experts” in their sports.  I could have never coached their sport as well as they did.  On the other side of that, I tried to make it so that they couldn’t do my job as well as I did. 

When you consider the training and development of your son/daughter or your athletes, please keep all of this in mind.  There are qualified people who can run a strength/speed/agility program.  Of course, there are also some who claim that they can.  Believe it or not, designing and running a fitness program is much different than training athletes to maximize their potential.  Find someone who has experience dealing with athletes, someone who has a degree in exercise science or a related field, and someone who has credentials from a credible organization.  Not only will these people understand how to train an athlete to get better, they will understand the biomechanical and physiological aspects of the sport so that they can design and implement a top notch program. 

P.S.  If you want to see what one training program for females looks like, check out the video of the Auburn Softball Team below.

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Put Your Feet In The Sand

Feet In The Sand Pic

Ahhhhh… the title of this post probably makes you think of the beach – the soft sand, the waves crashing, the sun warming your body.  Sounds like a great day.

Of course, since this is a blog about training athletes, we all know this post isn’t about fun in the sun.  While we usually think of the fun that we have at the beach, it’s also a place for your athletes to get some good speed & agility work in.  Now I know that you’re wondering “why would I take my athletes to the beach to train?”.  The question should be “why haven’t I been taking them?”. 

Benefits of Sand Training

  • Deceased forces on the body due to shock absorbsion of the sand
  • Increased use of muscles due to instability of the sand
  • Increased challenges to balance and coordination due to instability of the sand
  • Increased ankle strength

Once you read through the list most of it probably makes sense.  Many of the benefits do come from the fact that the sand is an unstable surface.  I have heard former NFL players claim that they never had ankle injuries in their career due to training in the sand.  That benefit in itself is huge for most athletes. 

I know that there are people on all ends of the “functional training” spectrum.  Some coaches design their entire program on balance pads and inflatable balls.  Others don’t do any exercises on either of them. I tend to fall somewhere in the middle.  The thing about sand training is that it can keep both sides happy.  It allows you to do “traditional” agility and speed drills while also incorporating an unstable component.

So how do you design a sand workout?

First off, I wouldn’t plan on using the sand every day.  It can be taxing on the legs.  Plus, when it comes to sport specificity, unless you play sand volleyball you need to spend time on the court, grass, etc.  As for what to do, almost any type of cone drill, mini hurdle drill, jumping drill, or speed drill can be adapted to the sand.  Let your imagination go wild!! 

What do you do if you don’t live near a beach?  If you don’t want to build your own sand pit, you will have to look around a little.  Many places have parks with sand volleyball courts that you can use.  Some lakes have a recreational beach that has sand.  See what you can find that will work for your training.

Good Luck!

 

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Top Notch Training

In the May/June issue of  Training and Conditioning, Matt Delancey explains how he designs the program for the Florida Gator Women’s volleyball team. 

This is probably one of the most interesting articles I’ve read in a long time.  I’ve heard Matt speak a couple of times at clinics and was fortunate enough to get to observe him conduct a training session at UF.  I think that he does a great job and this article explains why.  Matt puts emphasis on three things in the program:

  1. Developing sport specific athleticism
  2. Injury prevention training
  3. Addressing individual weaknesses

Obviously most of us try to design our programs in a way that the same 3 items are addressed.  I do admit that a volleyball team has less bodies to train than some other sports so some things are easier to plan for and incorporate.   Regardless, it is a good read and worth your time.  I encourage you to check it out.

 

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What I Learned – NSCA Conference 2010

Hello all! 

I got to attend the National Strength & Conditioning Association National Conference last week in Orlando, FL.  Fortunately for me it was only a short commute away.  I always enjoy conferences and try to take a professional attitude towards them.  While it is nice to run into old friends, I am there to make myself better. I really try to get something out of the sessions and view them as a chance to get the gears in my mind working.  Sometimes you can’t use what you learn directly, but if it gives you a better picture of something or makes you think of something that you can use, then the conference was a success.  Continue reading

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